Roadmovie

5min 31sec | 4:3 | DV-PAL | 2003


This work belongs to a series of experiments, that led me to question the interaction between the human brain and the medium video.


In this case a camera was attached to the center of a car’s left front wheel, pointing sidewards, perpendicular to the road. The route was a round trip, so that we can speak of a physical loop.
The length, composition and climax of the movie is determined mainly by the route, velocity and the duration of the round trip.


To make a delicious strawberry milkshake you need to carefully mix the ingredients with an electric blender. The same applies to soups, sauces and other culinary finesses.
With the camera mounted to the front wheel of my car, I was able to mix the main ingredients for a road movie. The whisked images charge the film with a feeling of madness, disaster and, at the same time, euphoric and hysteric climaxes.
It is a short journey that doesn’t lead anywhere. It describes a round trip and begins with the same picture as it ends: A portrait of a cow, seen from the perspective of a car’s front wheel.
A camera with microphone is attached to its middle, so that the pictures start to turn as the car starts to move. As faster the car, as more the pictures diverge.
At a certain point patterns, spirals and kaleidoscopic effects seem to appear, which is strongly linked to each single change of movement and the driving attitude of its conductor.
Analyzing the pictures frame by frame, there are no patterns, no kaleidoscopic effects at all.
It is an illusion due to how the man’s brain renders the images made by a fast turning camera.
The sound is taken from the cameras built-in-microphone and enhances the perception.
In the beginning man hears a smooth ticking motor on idle, but depending on the velocity of the car, the sound of the accelerating motor fades to the sound of ripping airstream.


Produced during the artist in residence program at Schloss Ringenberg, Germany, 2003.






Only the original format (DV-PAL) works the intended way. Every half-frame counts to insure a crisp, collective illusions of kaleidoscopic patterns and the image quality of each frame, which makes it nearly impossible to transcode this movie to other presentation formats, like DVD or internet streaming.




Jury Statement (Impakt Festival Award 2004):
“Playing on the genres of road movie and Dutch landscape painting, Dramaturgische Ikonologie
conveys a marvelous feeling of freedom through an astonishing study of perception and the beauty of
abstraction.”